Study in Belgium

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Location shot of Belgium

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Key facts

  • Currency
    Euro €
  • Student population
    325,000
  • Languages
    Flemish, French and German
  • Universities
    6

Why study in Belgium?

As the established hub for European politics, Belgium's capital Brussels has more journalists and ambassadors than Washington DC and is a base for international business.

If you choose to study a degree in Belgium, you will be living in the heart of Europe with excellent universities, great career prospects and the chance to influence European business and politics of the future.

Belgium

Where can you study in Belgium

Belgium has a complex education system due to the mixture of influences in its society. The country has three separate communities stemming from three languages: Flemish, French and German. Each community has its own government, parliament and education system. You should decide which community and type of education best fits you for study in Belgium.

Belgium is an easy country to travel around – you can get to most places of interest in the country within two hours of Brussels.

What is the cost of study in Belgium?

Belgium can be a very affordable option for some international students. Tuition fees in Belgium for those from inside the EU and EEA can be as little as €850, however private institutions may charge considerably more. If you’re from outside of the EU and EEA then tuition fees will cost between €1,500 to €5,000 a year.

Living costs in Belgium are regarded as high, however they are significantly lower than many other places in Europe.

What are the requirements to study in Belgium?

Qualifications

Specific program requirements are set by Belgian universities and may differ between programs. You will need to have completed secondary education for a university to determine whether or not you meet their qualification standards.

English language tests

Belgian universities accept a range of English Language tests including IELTS academic test, TOEFL iBT and C1 Advanced.

Belgium student visa

You’ll need a Belgian long stay visa if you are an international student in Belgium that is not from the EU or EEA.

Applying for a visa to study in Belgium has to be done directly through a Belgian embassy or consulate.

Working whilst studying in Belgium is possible up to 20 hours a week: you usually need to get a specific work permit alongside your visa in order to work part time.

How to study in Belgium?

Find out how to study abroad with Studee. We're the smart alternative to applying direct - we help you find and apply to your chosen universities abroad and maximize your chances of getting admitted.

Student reviews for Belgium

Saskia Greczko
de flag
Studied Business & Management Studies at Artevelde University of Applied Sciences
Overall Experience
  • Academic
    5
  • University social
    3
  • Accommodation
    3
  • University facilities
    4
What's it like to study in Belgium

The tuition is rather low and very worth it. The content of classes (and lectures) are very interesting and usable for the professional career. The structure of the class is always explained at the beginning of the semester and sometimes at the beginning of the class, to get an easy overview. The workload can become quite intense in some periods but otherwise it is very manageable.

Regina Maggiani
mx flag
Studied Business & Management Studies at Artevelde University of Applied Sciences
Overall Experience
  • Academic
    4
  • University social
    5
  • Accommodation
    3
  • University facilities
    2
What's it like to study in Belgium

My teachers have been good overall, with some exceptions of really bad teachers that make it almost impossible to pass the class, to amazing teachers that motivate me to keep on studying and that make classes feel like great opportunities to learn new things rather than obligations to complete. Some classes tend to be dynamic, which I like, and I really enjoy the use of real life business cases to study the topics we see and to be evaluated. I’m following the Global Challenges program unit and I must add that I am loving it, the workload is sometimes too much but that’s because, unlike most of my GC classmates, I follow two other courses as well. But my teachers are great and I enjoy the class a lot, and the environment is so nice with my classmates.

Andrei Cioloboc
re flag
Studied Business & Management Studies at Artevelde University of Applied Sciences
Overall Experience
  • Academic
    3
  • University social
    4
  • Accommodation
    4
  • University facilities
    4
What's it like to study in Belgium

Easy to learn about the international business life and all the necessary factors you need to know in order to start a business.

Ibukun Moses-simon
ng flag
Studied Business & Management Studies at Artevelde University of Applied Sciences
Overall Experience
  • Academic
    5
  • University social
    5
  • Accommodation
    4
  • University facilities
    5
What's it like to study in Belgium

Lecturers were really good. Some were good communicators while others were not. I think the tuition fees for international students is a too high and if the school management can look in that. Workload is manageable.

Anna Balashova
re flag
Studied Business & Management Studies at Artevelde University of Applied Sciences
Overall Experience
  • Academic
    5
  • University social
    5
  • Accommodation
    5
  • University facilities
    5
What's it like to study in Belgium

International Business Management program is the best one you can follow! The lecturers are incredibly nice with a very good level of English. You as a student can really feel that they invested enough time to prepare the lesson. They are always open to talk after class to you, give extra explanations. There are a lot of group works, that are very frustrating sometimes, but when you get used to them you start enjoying them as well! Although the tuition fees are pretty high for students from non-EU, but it comes from the government rather than the university. Long story short, I love my study program!

What the experts say about Belgium

  • Profile of Denzil Walton
    Denzil Walton
    Denzil Walton says:

    Three top tips for living in Belgium

    Use the public transport system. Belgium’s roads – particularly in and around the cities – tend to be crowded. The public transport system is good, generally efficient, and good value. I would also encourage visitors to hire a bike to explore a city or the countryside. Flanders in particular is generally flat and has good cycle paths (although not yet as good as in the Netherlands!).

    Don’t be afraid to look beyond the usual touristic sights and places to visit. There are lots of unusual, lesser known places to visit and sights to see, some of which I describe in my blog.. It’s the same with museums. It’s great to visit the big fine arts and history museums in the country, but there are hundreds of small museums, sometimes run privately or as a hobby, that are well worth visiting.

    Learn the local language; it will help you integrate. Having said that, most people speak English, especially in Flanders, and are keen to try it out.

    Why should people come to Belgium?

    It has an excellent healthcare system, with GPs available promptly and top-class hospitals, particularly in the cities.

    Its education system is solid with an emphasis on learning and discipline in an encouraging environment. All four of our children were educated in the Flemish education system, right from the age of three, so I have direct experience of its values.

    It’s a small country but is incredibly rich in history and nature. You could spend years exploring the beautiful cities of Brussels, Ghent, Antwerp, Mechelen, Bruges and Leuven, while if your interest is nature you will appreciate the hills, forests and pretty little villages in the Ardennes, or the low heathland of Limburg.

    Finally, the country is centrally located so it’s easy to travel to other European countries, particularly by train.

    The best things about Belgium

    As an enthusiastic hiker and cyclist. one of the greatest inventions coming out of Belgium is the Walking Route Network (wandelknooppuntnetwerk) or its equivalent, the Cycling Route Network (fietsknooppuntnetwork). The system originated in the Limburg mining industry. Underground junctions were numbered, and arrows indicated the tunnels leading to the next numbered junctions. It was first transferred to cycle routes and then expanded to walking routes. The concept has gradually spread throughout Belgium and has also been extended to many areas of the Netherlands. The crux of the system is that it allows you to cycle/walk from one numbered junction to the next one. At each junction a signpost points you in the direction of the two or three next junctions. This leads to a much more flexible way of cycling/walking around the countryside than by following stipulated routes. Now you can mix and match to create your own cycling/hiking route. Obviously before you set out, a little preparation is necessary. Cycling and walking network maps are available from tourist offices, town halls and bookshops. Or you can go online at Fietsnet.be or Wandelknooppunt.be.

    As for other great things about Belgium, you might like to read my response to travel writer Bill Bryson who in a recent book said there was little of interest (“bugger all!”) to see in Belgium! I put him right (although I doubt if he’s seen my response).