Study in France

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Location shot of France

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Key facts

  • Currency
    Euro €
  • Student population
    2.8 million
  • Language
    French
  • Universities
    100

Why study in France?

French universities have a fantastic global reputation, especially in the fields of science and humanities. France are at the forefront of innovative academic research and techniques, offering a dynamic and exciting place to study.

France is a country steeped in history and culture with exciting cities and stunning countryside that spans from mountains to golden beaches. The proximity to other European destinations makes it popular with students who are looking to travel during their studies.

France

Where can you study in France

France has a high standard of living across the country and has a multicultural society. The country is used to welcoming international students, especially in the larger cities.

Cities such as Paris, Nice, and Marseille are some of the most popular destinations for international students in Europe, and can offer some of the very best teaching, culture, and cuisine in the world.

The North of France, including Paris, has hot summers and cold winters, whilst the South enjoys a Mediterranean climate of mild winters and hot summers. The Alps and the Pyrenees have cold winters which are great for skiing and other winter sports.

What is the cost of study in France?

A university in France can have tuition fees ranging from €7,200 - €15,200 per year. Whether the university is public or private will have an effect on the cost of tuition.

Living costs in France are similar to other western European countries. Things like utility bills, running a car, takeaway food and electrical items tend to be more expensive in France, but rent, wine and cheese, healthcare and clothing are often cheaper.

What are the requirements to study in France?

Qualifications

The entry requirements for each program in France will vary between different universities and areas of study. As a minimum you will need to have completed secondary education in your home country to a satisfactory level to be accepted by a university in France.

English language tests

International students wanting to study in France, in English, will need to prove their English language proficiency to the university they are applying to. The specific university will be able to advise on whether they require a TOEFL or IELTS certification, and the required score.

France student visa

Non-EU students will need to apply for an extended-stay student visa, with residency permit (VLS-TS).

When a VLS-TS visa is issued, students will be given an official form that they must present to the French office of immigration and integration (OFII).

A VLS-TS holder must, upon arriving in France, send the following to the OFII by registered mail:

  • The official form received from the consulate that issued the visa
  • A copy of passport pages showing the visa holders identity and the stamp indicating entry into France (or into the Schengen area)

How to study in France?

Find out how to study abroad with Studee. We're the smart alternative to applying direct - we help you find and apply to your chosen universities abroad and maximize your chances of getting admitted.

Student reviews for France

Ta Dang Khoa LE
vn flag
Studied Data Science at EURECOM
Overall Experience
  • Academic
    4
  • University social
    3
  • Accommodation
    5
  • University facilities
    4
What's it like to study in France

In general, France has high living standards with good public services and infrastructure. However, the country is not very safe, especially in Paris or Marseille. The people are, in general, quite friendly; but they go on strike too much :)

James Malongo
tz flag
Studied Applied Computer Science at EURECOM
Overall Experience
  • Academic
    5
  • University social
    5
  • Accommodation
    4
  • University facilities
    4
What's it like to study in France

France is a beautiful country with a rich history. If you love traveling, this is the place for you. Every region is unique so you can explore a wide variety of cultures, art and experiences without even leaving France! It is well connected by various means of transport like trains, buses and even some relatively cheap flights. To get the best experience, it is highly advised that you learn some French and don't feel shy about practicing it with the locals, they will appreciate the effort.

Sejal Jain
in flag
Studied Cyber Security at EURECOM
Overall Experience
  • Academic
    5
  • University social
    5
  • Accommodation
    5
  • University facilities
    4
What's it like to study in France

South of France is really really beautiful. Beautiful beaches, mountains alps. I felt, people are pretty friendly in South of France as compare to Paris or north side of France. You can visit so many places in the nearby area. You should always be aware of your last bus or train time because after that you are only left with getting costly uber.

Alexandros Ilias Spartalis
gr flag
Studied Applied Computer Science at EURECOM
Overall Experience
  • Academic
    5
  • University social
    5
  • Accommodation
    3
  • University facilities
    5
What's it like to study in France

France is nice place to study. You will need to know some basic french but that wouldn't be a problem as EURECOM offers language courses, and french is a beautiful language!

Jeanne GRENIER
fr flag
Studied Cyber Security at EURECOM
Overall Experience
  • Academic
    5
  • University social
    5
  • Accommodation
    4
  • University facilities
    3
What's it like to study in France

France is amazing, in the south of France you have so many activities that you can do.

What the experts say about France

  • Profile of Diane Wargnier
    Diane Wargnier
    Diane Wargnier says:

    Three top tips for living in France

    1. Remember that your experience is going to be uniquely yours, so don't get caught up in what everyone else is doing and what you think life in France should be like. Drop all of your expectations and just experience France for all it is - the pros and cons.

    I feel like foreigners have very romantic, idealized notions of France and the French. That everyone is thin and beautiful and fashionable and they all just sit around at cafes drinking coffee and wine and eating baguettes. Or that real life is a 24/7 vacation. While France is beautiful and charming and has so many positives, it's also a real place with real people and their problems, like anywhere. I work, I have a mortgage, I run errands and have all the real-life stresses that people have anywhere. France truly is gorgeous and I find the people to be generous and kind. I think sometimes people move to France with rose-colored glasses on not realizing that life as a tourist and actually living here are two different things.

    1. Always remember your manners. One of the most important things you have to remember to do is greet people with a bonjour before asking for anything. We need to be aware of cultural norms and do our best to be respectful of French culture and the French when on their turf. We’re visitors, after all. In France, beginning any interaction with a “bonjour” is as close to mandatory as any rule is for foreigners and locals alike. Forgoing the compulsory bonjour (or “bonsoir” in the evening) is not only out of touch with French norms but it will communicate to French people that you’re lacking in basic education.

    2. Learn as much French as you can! Most French people -- especially outside of big cities -- do not speak conversational English, so do your best to get your French up to speed. It not only shows respect but it lets you become a part of your community and not just a bystander observing life around them.

    Why should people come to France?

    People should come to France for the wonderful food including cheese, pastries, wine and so much. They should come to experience a more civilized work/life balance and healthcare system. They should come to learn about French culture and see the beautiful landscapes that make France what it is. Life abroad isn't easy but it's worth it. You'll experience little wins that make you proud of how far you've come and learn things about yourself that you maybe never would have learned if you had stayed in your home country.

    The best things about France

    There are so many things, so let's see... On the surface, I could tell you about the wonderful food culture. Amazing wine, cheese, and bread count for a lot. Also, the fact that healthcare is a right for everyone and not something you lose if you're laid off from your job is a huge plus. Medical debt isn't a problem in France and the peace of mind just knowing you're covered is amazing. The system isn't perfect but it has a lot going for it in my opinion.

    If I go deeper, now after nearly 8 years here, I'd have to say that I love living in a place that challenges me every day. Nothing is comfortable. From the language to the culture to the bureaucracy to even more mundane day-to-day struggles like when the pharmacy closes 10 minutes early just because they feel like it (when you really need a prescription), France pushes me to be better. Living abroad has pushed to be more patient and understanding and to prove to myself that I can succeed.

    Maybe my favorite part of living in France is that I’m experiencing my husband’s culture firsthand and getting to know his home while having him by my side. Discovering new regions of France is something I really enjoy as well – especially Brittany which is a short drive from where we live.